LadyAnastasia’s Secret Sanctuary

I am lala! Great Creation Goddess, Priestess of Random, and Queen of Everything I Foresee, and Then-some.

Author and creator of P.U.T.A (People for the Un-Ethical Treatment of Asshats) You'll see that I do sometimes bite.

But I'm usually upbeat, sometimes not so much, very random, and always lala.

These are the ramblings of an Underground Goddess.

Please note, this is a personal blog and I do occasionally post some unpopular opinions and heated rants.
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my-movie-madness:

Clark Gable and Jeanette MacDonald, ”San Francisco” 1936

Joan Blondell & Bette Davis in Three on a Match, 1932

(via julia-loves-bette-davis)

threedifferentways:

Respect your sources. If your source is oathbound and you learn something of note from them no matter how unintentionally, then don’t blab the damn thing because you aren’t oathbound. Respect your source and you won’t find that door slammed in your face.

  • Person: you're a witch? Maybe you can help me you see I have a ghost at my house and it's always making noise and bothering me how do I make it stop?
  • Me: have you tried yelling at it

lastdaysofmagic:

blackbird

cyborgias:

Who wants to know they are hunted by the Devil?

cyborgias:

Who wants to know they are hunted by the Devil?

(via queencersei)

urhajos:

New works by James Kerr

evilsupplyco:

gothiccharmschool:

skelepoison-spooks:

IT HAS BEGUN

THREAT LEVEL PUMPKIN

We’re going to start yelling “THREAT LEVEL PUMPKIN” at heroes when we storm their bases.

Red + Art

The Storm on the Sea of Galilee is a painting from 1633 by the Dutch Golden Age painter Rembrandt van Rijn that was in the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum of Boston, Massachusetts, United States, prior to being stolen.
On the morning of March 18, 1990, thieves disguised as police officers broke into the museum and stole The Storm on the Sea of Galilee and 12 other works. It is considered the biggest art theft in US history and remains unsolved.

A Young Woman Seated at the Virginals is a painting now generally attributed to Johannes Vermeer, though this was for a long time widely questioned. A series of technical examinations from 1993 onwards confirmed the attribution. It is thought to date from c.1670 and is now in a private collection in New York.

(via its-all-about-the-blacklist)